Reflective Writing Skills Essay

Writing skills are very fundamental skills for all kinds of purposes, but especially when writing essays. It is very difficult to write a good essay without the proper writing skills. Although everyone claims he or she can write a good essay, many people lack the needed skills that make an essay a polished piece of writing. The difference between professional writers and the everyday person is that the professional writer has writing skills that makes his or her essays stand out.

Writing skills are very essential when writing any kind of an essay. Many students do not possess the good writing skills that are very important. Students should admit to themselves that this is among their greatest weaknesses and seek help from professionals who are very competent in their essay writing skills. Good writing skills involve the ability to write an essay that is free from grammatical errors, with a good content as well as style and structure. A good writer must understand and progress through the writing process, which includes prewriting, writing, revision, and proofreading.

Part of the writing process is in knowing who the intended audience is and the purpose of the writing. In many cases, students fail to understand their audience or how to relate to that audience. If the student knows in advance that the writing is to target a specific audience, then the student needs to know what interest that audience and what kinds of opinions that audience is likely to have on certain subjects. Students start writing their essays without first identifying their audience which is very wrong.

Another fallacy that students often commit is failing to create an outline that will assist them in organizing their thoughts, thus ensuring that no points are left out when writing the essay. An outline helps to ensure that the essay has a clear flow and that every point is well explained. Besides the outline, students must take seriously the use of good grammar as well as utilization of appropriate stylistic techniques. Essays written by professionals are always reader friendly because the professionals make use of headings, subheadings, and listing whenever possible. These strategies help the reader to follow the writer’s train of thought. Moreover, readers find it easier to read a page that has been broken down to small paragraphs than a page with long paragraphs. An essay that is easily scanned is quite attractive to the reader.

These are some of the writing skills that many students do not possess. Although professional writers utilize these strategies, students can learn them as well. However, they must spend time and diligence in understanding what makes good writing, and then they must practice.

How to Write a Reflective Essay on Writing Skills
An individual who wishes to become an accomplished writer must learn to reflect on his writing. An effective strategy is to develop a writing portfolio.

This is a collection of writing the person does over a period of time. Part of that portfolio is writing reflective essays. For example, if the individual writes a story, he can then write a reflective essay on that story. He can critique himself on his plot structure and character development. He can discuss what he was trying to accomplish and how well he succeeded. If the individual is critiquing his general writing skills, then he might choose a piece he wrote at the beginning of the school year and compare it to a piece he wrote at the end of the school year. He might note improvements he has made in vocabulary development, sentence structure, organization of ideas, and development of a thesis. In summary, the purpose of a reflective essay on writing is to examine one’s own writing to identify strengths and weaknesses and to establish goals for improvement.

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'We do not learn from experience...we learn from reflecting on experience.'

John Dewey

Reflective writing differs from other kinds of university writing that you may be more familiar with. Reflective writing is meant to encourage you to reveal your personal thoughts about your life experiences in relation to the content you are learning about in your units.  Many assessment tasks at university ask for reflection. You may see instructions like:

  • Write a reflective report on....
  • Keep a reflective journal around.....
  • Write a reflective essay on....
  • Compile weekly reflective notes about...

What is reflective writing?

Reflection means taking some time to examine your own thoughts, beliefs, values, attitudes and assumptions about your understanding of a topic, a situation or a problem. When you reflect, think about your own experiences and knowledge and how you arrived at that understanding. Often our thinking has been shaped by the values of our family and culture, an embarrassing or uncomfortable situation, our religion, past teachers, newspapers, TV shows and so on. There is no absolute right or wrong way with reflective thinking. But the key questions in reflective thinking are how? and why? rather than what?

Reflective writing varies across disciplines which have particular ways of thinking about the world, and how to interpret the meanings of actions and things. In some disciplines, for example nursing and education, reflection is used to create knowledge and improve professional practice.

Lecturers may ask you to write reflectively for a range of reasons:

  • To become an active learner by asking questions and thinking critically about your own ideas.
  • To examine what you have learned and how you have learned it.
  • To make connections, for example between what you already know and what you are learning, between theory and practice or between course content and personal experience.
  • To indicate your understanding by identifying any questions you have, and what you have yet to learn.
  • To learn from mistakes by identifying how you would do it differently next time and also to identify and accept what you could not change at the time.
  • To encourage you to become a reflective practitioner in your future career. This is the key to life-long learning, growth and meaningful change.

How to write reflectively

It is important that you write reflectively according to your unit and discipline. Read your assessment carefully, and ask your lecturer for further guidance if you are not sure.

Writing reflectively can be assisted with some guiding questions:

  • What happened during that event or experience? And why did it happen?
  • What was my role in the event? And why did I adopt that particular role?
  • What were my feelings during that experience? And why did I feel that way?
  • What were my thoughts during that experience? And why did I think that way?
  • How do I interpret what I experienced or observed?
  • What might this experience mean in the context of my course?
  • What other perspectives, theories or concepts could be applied to interpret the situation?
  • How can I learn from this experience?

There are a number of reflection models you can use to help construct your writing. One useful reflection model is "The 4 Rs" which is outlined below.  The 4Rs process is based on "Reflection-On-Action" - this means actions are analysed and re-framed after an event or observation, and potential solutions are developed. The process is designed to encourage you to address your ongoing learning from a number of standpoints, such as practical, cognitive and emotional, and from your own values, ethics and beliefs.

Report

In the Report stage you describe, report or retell the key elements of what you have learnt, seen or experienced.

Relate

In the Relate stage you draw a relationship between your current personal or theoretical understandings and identify aspects of the observation that have a personal meaning or that connect with your experience.

Reason

In the Reason stage you explore the relationship between theory and practice and seek a deep understanding of why something has happened.
You explore or analyse a concept, event or experience by asking questions and looking for answers, reviewing the literature, considering alternatives and multiple perspectives.

Reconstruct

In the Reconstruct stage you discuss improvements that could be made or identify something you need or plan to do or change. You should be able to generalise and/or apply your learning to other contexts and your future professional practice. This might involve developing general principles, formulating personal theories of teaching or taking a stand or position on an issue.

Useful phrases for reflecting

When you write a reflection the reader will expect to learn about your personal experience, feelings, ideas and opinions.  Use the first person (I, my, me).

Phrases below can be incorporated with your ideas to express:

  • your experience of a situation
  • personal reaction to an idea, opinion or person
  • evaluation of an argument
  • comparison with another idea
  • comment on the worth of an idea
  • identification of key issues
  • how well you understood something

Try using these phrases:

  • My experience of this leads me to believe/think/question…
  • I think/feel/believe/hope/am convinced...
  • I remember/recall...
  • This was difficult/easy/frightening/exciting etc.
  • I find this worrying/amusing/convenient etc.
  • For me, this assertion is very difficult to agree with...
  • I agree/do not agree with Smith (2013) when she argues that...
  • Based on my personal beliefs and experiences…
  • In my mind the key question/issue is…
  • It had not occurred to me that …

Further resources

Bain, JD, Ballantyne, R, Mills, C & Lester, NC 2002, Reflecting on practice: student teachers' perspectives, Post Pressed, Flaxton Qld.

Williams K, Woolliams, M, & Spiro, J 2012, Reflective writing, Palgrave Macmillan, New York.

University of N.S.W. - Reflective writing

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